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short biography of members of Mandala 2017 Russia

 

 OFFICIAL MANDALA GROUP OF DREPUNG GOMANG MONASTERY TO RUSSIA

2017

 

KHAJOK TULKU alias GESHE JAMPA DHONDUP

Born to mother Tsedon and father Sophe Tsewang, Khajok Tulku alias Geshe Jampa Dhondup was born in 1975, from age 8-13 he studied at school in his native place. In 1988, he received his novice ordination vows (Gelong) from Khensur Rinpoche Tadin Tsewang. In 1991, he enrolled in Drepung Gomang Monastery and studied Buddhist Philosophy for 17 years. On 1st April, 1999, he was recognized by His Holiness the Dalai Lama as the reincarnation of Khajok and also received his Gelong ordination vows from His Holiness the Dalai Lama that same year. In 2008, he enrolled for the highest examination of Gelug University (Gelug Gyuktoe) and in 2014, was honored with Geshe Lharampa title after coming in first division in all six years. As customary tradition for Geshe Lharampas, he appeared for customary debate during Monlam Ceremony. In 2015, he joined Gyumed Tantric College as one year mandatory Tantrayana course for Geshes. After all his academic achievements, Rinpoche has been providing teachings to the young novice monks. Rinpoche  will be giving religious teachings/jenang/lectures beside performing 'divination;mo' when requested.

 

GESHE JAMYANG SANGAY (former chant master of Drepung Gomang Monastery)

The Former Chant Master of Drepung Gomang Monastery, Geshe Jamyang Sangay was born in 1977, at the age of eleven he joined this monastery. After completing extensive courses and curriculum of this monastery, he was honored with Geshe title in 2012. From 18th May, 2008, he was appointed as the Chant Master (chenmo la) of Drepung Gomang Monastery. Beside his religious obligations, Geshe Jamyang Sangay has visited Russia, Poland and USA for religious purpose after receiving invitations from various dharma centers. Geshe la is very well versed with all the prayers/chants/rituals of the monastery and will be doing prayers when requested.

GESHE SONAM RINCHEN 

Geshe Sonam Rinchen was born on 1975, at the age of 10, he became monk at othok Monastery. After studying elementary texts, he later joined Drepung Gomang Monastery in 1995. He received his novice ordination (Getsul) vows from Gen Lobsang Jampa in 1992 and full ordination vows (Gelong vows) from His Holiness the Dalai Lama in 2003. After completion of all curriculum of Drepung Gomang Monastery, he was honored with Geshe Tsokrampa title in 2014. 

VEN. SOEPA GYATSO

Soepa  Gyatso was born in Dehradun. He became monk at the age of 16 at his native place and received his novice vows from Amchok Tsondue, studied reading of Buddhist texts at his native place. In 1998, he joined Drepung Gomang Monastery where he started studies on the elementary monastic texts on Buddhist Philosophy. In 2000, he received his Gelong vows (vows of fully ordained monk) from His Holiness the Dalai Lama. He is at present studying in Kyab Bog Class (the sixteenth Grade –of 16 year of monastic curriculum) on Five Major Treatise on Buddhist Philosophy.

 

VEN. KALSANG YESHI,

Ven. Kalsang Yeshi, born in 1984. At the age of nine, he became a monk at the Chergi monastery in Tibet and received his novice ordination vows (Getsul) from H.E. Kalsang Wodeer Rinpoche in 1993. After joining Drepung Gomang Monastery in 2004, he studied Buddhist Philosophy and has reached Karam Bog (Vinaya 2nd year). In 2009, he received Full ordination vows (Gelong) from His Holiness the Dalai Lama.

 

VEN. TSULTIM DHARGYAL,

Ven. Tsultim Dhargyal, born in 1985. He became monk at the age of 10 and joined Drepung Gomang Monastery in 1996. He received his novice ordination vows (Getsul) from Khensur Rinpoche Geshe Lobsang Tenpa (current Drepung Tri Rinpoche) in 1996. Studying Buddhist philosophy classes of monastic curriculum, he has reached Karam Sarpa (vinaya ).

 

 ***

VEN. ALDYN KHEREL  NORBU (SHERAB)

Ven. Aldyn Kherel  Norbu (Sherab), Tuva monk student of monastery will be accompanying the group as the interpreter for doctor. He has assisted with translation in past tours as well as here in the monastery.

 

DR.TONPA KYAB: 

Dr. Tonpa Kyab was born in Amdo, Tibet in the year 1975.He has done his primary, secondary and Higher secondary studies from Tibet and came to India in the year 1994. He has further studied for 2 years in Sahara Institute, Dharamsala on the History of Tibet, Buddhist Philosophy and languages. Appeared for entrance examination of Tibetan Medicine in 1997, studied Tibetan Medicine at Mentsekhang for five years and did internship of one year as per the mandatory rule of Mentsekhang.  Thereafter, he was appointed as a Tibetan Medicine Doctor by TMAI (Tibetan Medical and Astro. Institute, Dharamsala) and was dispatch to various Tibetan Medical clinics in different cities, Mumbai, Kolkatta, etcs and different Tibetan settlement to serve the people and societies as a whole. He has worked under Men-Tse Khang for 10 years in a clinical practice and 2 years as a Researcher in Literary Research Department of Men-Tse Khang. During 12 years in his medical field, he has been invited to different Centers in Switzerland, Germany, New Zealand and Singapore. He will be visiting Russia with Drepung Gomang official Mandala Tour group 2015, 2016 to extend his service to people in Russia and other areas. 

 

bios of 2016 Russia Mandala tour


 From left to right : Ven. Dhargyal, Ven.Tenzin Norbu, Ven. Geshe Kalsang, Ven. Geshe Lharampa Kalsang Tsondu (Gyaltsang Rinpoche),Ven.Tenzin Gyatso, Ven. Tenzin Kunzang.

NAME: Venrable Tulku Gyaltsang Rinpoche alias Geshe Lharampa Kalsang Tsondu (ON CHAIR)

In 1996, His Holiness the Dalai Lama recognized him as the Sixth Gyaltsang Rinpoche. Venerable Tulku Gyaltsang Rinpoche became monk at the age of 13, received his novice ordination vows from Geshe Kalsang Gyatso and Gelong vows (Bhikhu ordination vows: Full ordination vows) from Detsa Yeshi Gyatso at the age of 25. After joining this monastery in 1993, Rinpoche studied the (Five Major Treatise on Buddhist Philosophy, 16 year courses) and has also passed all the Gelug Gyuktoe (Gelug University Examination of six years course) with remarkable result and was conferred Geshe Lharampa title in 2009 (equivalent to Ph.D in Western University).

Ven. Gyaltsang Rinpoche will lead this Mandala Tour group. Rinpoche has previously visited England, Canada and Russia. Rinpoche will be giving religious teachings, conducting sacred rituals, fire pujas besides blessing the homes and people where ever the group will visit.

 
NAME: GESHE KALSANG (Third from left)

Geshe Kalsang born in Amdo province in Tibet. From age seven to fourteen, he studied at the school at his native place where he also studied Chinese. At the age of seventeen, under Khenpo Losel Gyatso, he took novice ordination vow (Getsul vows) and became monk at his native place, entered a monastic temple where he studied the elementary monastic texts. At the age of 20, he took his Gelong Vows (Bhikhu ordination vows: full ordination) from Khenpo Losel Gyatso and continued his monastic studies at monastery in his native place. He fled to India in 1990 to pursue monastic studies and to get blessing from H. H. the Dalai Lama, after getting blessing and audience with H.H. the Dalai Lama, he later joined Drepung Gomang Monastery in South India. He has completed all the monastic class in the monastic college (17 years) and has also attained two years of Gelug Gyuktoe (Gelug University Examination) and was conferred Geshe Kyabchu title in 2005.


 
NAME: DHARGYAL (First from left)

Born in 1971, Dhargyal became monk at the age of 15 and joined this monastery in 1996. He received his Getsul vows (novice ordination vows) in 1986 from Lobsang Gyatso and Gelong vows (Bhikhu ordination vows: Full ordination) from His Holiness the Dalai Lama in 2010. He is qualified in Sand Mandala construction, butter sculpture and chants/prayer rituals. He will also play the monastic religious musical instruments like little trumpet (clarinet) and Long horn (dungchen)
 


NAME: TENZIN GYATSO (second from right)

Born in 1977, Tenzin Gyatso became monk at the age of 18 and joined this monastery in 1998. He received his Getsul vows (novice ordination vows) in 1995 from Tenzin Delek Rinpoche and Gelong vows (Bhikhu ordination vows: Full ordination) from His Holiness the Dalai Lama in 2000. He is qualified in Sand Mandala construction, butter sculpture and chants/prayer rituals. He will also play the monastic religious musical instruments Long horn (dungchen) and clarinet (gyaling)
 
NAME: TENZIN NORBU (second from left)

Tenzin Norbu, born in 1986 and became monk at the age of 10 and joined this monastery in 1996. He received his Getsul vows (novice ordination vows) in 1996 from Khensur Rinpoche Geshe Lobsang Tenpa. He is qualified in Sand Mandala construction, butter sculpture and chants/prayer rituals. He will also play the monastic religious musical instruments like Long horn (dungchen)

 
NAME: TENZIN KUNZANG (First from right)

Born in 1984, Tenzin Kunzang became monk at the age of 10 and joined this monastery in 1994. He received his Getsul vows (novice ordination vows) in 1994 from Lobsang Chenrap and Gelong vows (Bhikhu ordination vows: Full ordination) from His Holiness the Dalai Lama in 2009. He is qualified in Sand Mandala construction, butter sculpture and chants/prayer rituals. He will also play the monastic religious musical instruments like little trumpet (clarinet) and Long horn (dungchen).


 ***

Ven. Aldyn Kherel (Above)

Ven. Aldyn Kherel  Norbu (Sherab), Tuva monk student of monastery will be accompanying the group as the interpreter for doctor. He has assisted with translation in past tours as well as here in the monastery.



A BRIEF BIOGRAPHY OF DR.TONPA KYAB:(above picture)
 

Dr. Tonpa Kyab was born in Amdo, Tibet in the year 1975.He has done his primary, secondary and Higher secondary studies from Tibet and came to India in the year 1994. He has further studied for 2 years in Sahara Institute, Dharamsala on the History of Tibet, Buddhist Philosophy and languages. Appeared for entrance examination of Tibetan Medicine in 1997, studied Tibetan Medicine at Mentsekhang for five years and did internship of one year as per the mandatory rule of Mentsekhang.  Thereafter, he was appointed as a Tibetan Medicine Doctor by TMAI (Tibetan Medical and Astro. Institute, Dharamsala) and was dispatch to various Tibetan Medical clinics in different cities, Mumbai, Kolkatta, etcs and different Tibetan settlement to serve the people and societies as a whole. He has worked under Men-Tse Khang for 10 years in a clinical practice and 2 years as a Researcher in Literary Research Department of Men-Tse Khang. During 12 years in his medical field, he has been invited to different Centers in Switzerland, Germany, New Zealand and Singapore. Currently, he is working in Lhagon Jangchup Choeling Buddhist Cultural Society, Tezu, Arunachal Pradesh as Tibetan Medicine Doctor. He visited Russia last year and will be visiting again Russia with Drepung Gomang official Mandala Tour group 2016 to extend his service to people in Russia and other areas.


Bios of Mandala Group members 2015

OFFICIAL MANDALA TOUR TO RUSSIA 2015.

On the chair: Venerable Ngawang Nyendak, reincarnation of Gopel Rinpoche, the 79th Abbot of Lithang Monastery. His reincarnation was recognized by His Holiness the Dalai Lama. Rinpoche joined this monastery in 1992 and received his Gelong vows (full ordination vows) from His Holiness the Dalai Lama. Rigorously studying Five Major treatise on Buddhist Philosophy at the monastery under teacher His Eminence Khen Rinpoche Geshe Yonten Dhamchoe and Geshe Lobsang Tsultrim, the Tutor to Yongzin Kundeling Rinpoche, Gopel Rinpoche Ngawang Nyendak completed his Geshe Lharampa (doctorate of Philosophy) in 2013 from Gelug University Board.

Rinpoche will be offering Empowerment (Wang) and Transmission (Lung) religious teachings, conduct sacred rituals and divination (m0-fortune telling). Rinpoche is respected Tulku of Drepung Gomang Monastery.


Third from Left(center): Geshe Lharampa Tenzin Khechok, chant master/Umdzed of the group, he became monk at the age of 12, receiving his novice ordination vows (Getsul vows) from Jetsun Lobang Khenrab at his native place. After studying Buddhist texts and scriptures there at the monastery in his native place for some years, he joined Drepung Gomang Monastery, South India in 1991.  He received his full ordination vows (Gelong vows) from His Holiness the Dalai Lama in 1998 at Thekchen Choiling, Dharamsala. After completion of Five Major treatise of Buddhist Philosophy at the monastery, he pursued further studies and was honored with Geshe Lharampa title (doctorate of Philosophy) in 2013.


First from Right: Geshe Anye, he became monk at the age of 14 at his native place and joined Drepung Gomang Monasery in 1992 where he started studies on Buddhist Philosophy. He received Getsul vows (novice ordination vows) from Lobsang Jampa Rinpoche in 1986. In 1997, he received Gelong vows (Full ordination vows) from His Holiness the Dalai Lama. After completion of his 16 years of monastic curriculum, he was honored with Geshe title in 2012.


Second from left: Ven. Thaye Gyatso, at the age of 17 he became a monk at his native place. He received Getsul vows (novice ordination vows) from Venerable Master Kalsang Gyamtso in 1994. He joined Drepung Gomang Monastery in 2000 to pursue studies on Buddhist Philosophy. He received Gelong vows (Full ordination vows) from His Holiness the Dalai Lama in 2012. Currently, he is studying in Zoe class of monastic curriculum.

First from left: Ven. Khedup Dakpa, became monk at the age of 13 at his native place and joined Drepung Gomang Monastery in 2004. He received Getsul donpa (novice ordination vows) from Master Ngawang Delyang at the age of 13. In 2008, he received Gelong donpa (Full ordination vows) from His Holiness the Dalai Lama. At present, he has reached Zoe class of monastic curriculum.


Second from Right: Ven. Thupten Rinchen, became monk at the age of 15. He received his Getsul vows (novice ordination vows) from Jampa Gyatso Rinpoche and received Gelong vows (Full ordination vows) from His Holiness the Dalai Lama. He is currently in Karam Sarwa of monastic curriculum/class.

 Top Left: DR.TONPA KYAB:

Dr. Tonpa Kyab was born in Amdo, Tibet in the year 1975.He has done his primary, secondary and Higher secondary studies from Tibet and came to India in the year 1994. He has further studied for 2 years in Sahara Institute, Dharamsala on the History of Tibet, Buddhist Philosophy and languages. Appeared for entrance examination of Tibetan Medicine in 1997, studied Tibetan Medicine at Mentsekhang for five years and did internship of one year as per the mandatory rule of Mentsekhang.  Thereafter, he was appointed as a Tibetan Medicine Doctor by TMAI (Tibetan Medical and Astro. Institute, Dharamsala) and was dispatch to various Tibetan Medical clinics in different cities, Mumbai, Kolkatta, etcs and different Tibetan settlement to serve the people and societies as a whole. He has worked under Men-Tse Khang for 10 years in a clinical practice and 2 years as a Researcher in Literary Research Department of Men-Tse Khang. During 12 years in his medical field, he has been invited to different Centers in Switzerland, Germany, New Zealand and Singapore. Currently, he is working in Lhagon Jangchup Choeling Buddhist Cultural Society, Tezu, Arunachal Pradesh as Tibetan Medicine Doctor. He will be visiting Russia with Drepung Gomang official Mandala Tour group 2015 to extend his service to people in Russia and other areas.

 

*Losar Celebration in Monastery*

The word Losar is a Tibetan word for New Year. LO means year and SAR means new. Tibetans celebrate their New Year as Losar. The Tibetan New Year is commemorated on the first day of the first month of the Tibetan lunar calendar, which usually falls in the month of January or February or even in March.

The Losar festival is considered to be the most significant of all Tibetan festivals. This festival is celebrated in other countries, such as India, Bhutan and Nepal, as well. Celebrated with immense splendor and grandeur, the Tibetan New Year is characterized by its music, dances and a general spirit of merrymaking. One can witness different traditions and rituals followed to mark this religious occasion.

Commemorated with immense splendor and grandeur, the Tibetan New Year is celebrated across 15 days of which the first three days are the most significant. The Buddhists mark the festival as a victory of good over evil. Symbolizing purification and freshness, Losar is a best excuse for the Tibetans to have a grand feasts and celebrations.

Losar in monastery

Few days before Losar, the discipline head of respective monasteries will consult with each other to set the date for the start of Losar holiday. Usually, Losar holiday starts around 26th or 27th day of last month of Tibetan calendar. Monks in the monastery clean up their rooms, dormitory, khangtsens and surrounding areas, as most of the painting work will be done during His Holiness visit, they will not be much concerned on this. On the first day of Losar, monks will visit their teacher (root lama/scripture/Text teacher) with Khatak (Tibetan Scarf) to extend warm wishes and to receive blessing from him for the New Year ahead. Then monks will be visiting monastery’s Prayer Hall temple, their Khangtsen’s prayer hall/room and extending greetings ‘Losar Tashi Delek’ with friends and class mates. As playing of little music is allowed on this special day, monks will indulge in listening to latest songs sung by brave Tibetan artist inside Tibet, bringing them closer to their homes back in Tibet. Preparing special food is a must on this special occasion, some monks are excellent chef, they will prepare special mouthwatering delicacies which they will share with their friends. When night falls, monks will come out of their rooms with their small cushion, gather at the venue (outdoor) where they will be shown feature films dubbed in Tibetan language on the white washed/painted walls. This screening will go on till the late evening where few young, small monks have fallen asleep on their cushion and had to woken up to walk towards their rooms rubbing their eyes.

On the sixth or seventh day, monks will gather either at Drepung or Gaden monastery to begin the annual Monlam Prayer Festival which will last till the 15th day of Losar. The Great Prayer Festival was established by the great Buddhist Master Je Tsongkhapa, the founder of the Gelug tradition, in 1409. The purpose of the Great Prayer Festival is to come together as a community and pray for the long lives of all of our Gurus, the spreading of the Dharma in all directions, and the well being of all sentient beings. The prayers also center on promoting peace and harmony throughout the world. On the sixteenth of first month of the Lunar Calendar, the sacred statue of Maitreya Buddha is carried in procession around Gaden or Drepung, as done in Tibet.  Preceding the statue as it leaves the main entrance of the Prayer Hall are monks of both monasteries bearing victory banners, and blowing conch shells, followed by Gaden Tripa (the throne holder) and Abbots of various monastic colleges, and followed by monks reciting their prayers. People from all walks of life throw white scarves towards the tractor/chariot carrying the sacred Maitreya statue, some pushing and pulling, trying to get a closer look and a blessing from the sacred statue, looking forward to being reborn in the age of Maitreya.


Once the procession is concluded, cycle race, a short marathon race, and a weightlifting competition among the nine Tibetan villages will commence. Once the prizes are distributed for the event, the monks will gather at the weightlifting spot and some easily lifting the boulder (monlam stone) with applause from monks.  All these activities usually end before lunchtime, and then concerned monks prepare for the next day ceremony:  "The Throwing of the Ritual Cake”  on the seventeenth day which will mark the end of Monlam Festival.

 

 

 

Great Je Tsong Khapa

BIOGRAPHY OF JE TSONGKHAPA : Je Tsongkhapa Lobzang Drakpa(Wylie: rje tsong kha pa blo bzang grags pa, 1357-1419), also known as Lama Tsongkhapa or by the honorific title Je Rinpoche (rje rin po che, “Precious Lord”) was born in 1357 at Tsongkha valley, Amdo region of northeastern Tibet. His birthplace is marked by the famous Kubum (sKu ‘bum) Monastery.

Education and Studies: At the age of three, Je Tsnogkhapa took lay vows from the 4th Karmapa Rolpay Dorje. Afterwards, he started his education with the Kadam master Choje Dondrub Rinchen, from whom he received numerous teachings and tantric initiations. Je Tsongkhapa is said to have been so sharp that he easily understood and memorized even the most complicated texts. When he was seven, he received novice vows from Choje Dondrub Rinchen and was given the ordination name of Lobzang Drakpa. Je Tshongkhapa continued studying with Choje Dondrub Rinchen until the age of sixteen when he left Amdo to pursue his quest for philosophical knowledge and trainings in central and southern Tibet, where he received teachings from more than fifty prominent teachers.

Je Tsongkhapa arrived in Central Tibet at the end of the Chi-Dar period (phyi dar, the Later Diffusion) of the long flowering of Buddhist intellectual activities. He started his studies with Tibetan medicine, followed by Buddhist texts and topics including Abhidharma, tenets focusing on Madhyamaka (the Middle Way) and Cittamātra (the Mind Only) views, Perfection of Wisdom, Five Treatises of Maitreya, and Pramāṇa (Valid Cognition). He also studied and practiced tantra extensively.He gained a rigorous intellectual training and a wide knowledge of both sutra and tantra during this period.At the age of 20, Je Tsongkhapa received the bhikshu vows of fully ordained monk. By studying intensively the works on valid cognition by Dignāga and Dharmakīrti, Je Tsongkhapa was deeply impressed and moved by the efficacy of Dharmakirti’s system of reasoning.It was Je Tsongkhapa’s emphasis on philosophical study and logic that would eventually become some of the defining characteristics of the Gelug tradition.

Je Tsongkhapa’s studies were mainly focused on the existing scholarly traditions of the time, of which the most significant being the Sakya tradition and the tradition of Sangphu, an important Kadam monastery. With a determination of combining scholarship with the practice of both tantra and sutra, Je Tsongkhapa also continuously received tantric teachings and initiations from, in addition to Choje Dondrub Rinchen while in Amdo, a number of important masters of different lineages, including those of Kagyu, Jonang, Sakya, and Nyingma.

Lamas: One of Je Tsongkhapa’s main teachers was JetsunRedawa Zhönu Lodrö (1349-1412)who was a strong proponent of the Prāsaṅgika view of Madhyamaka.Out of great devotion, Je Tsongkhapa wrote the famous verse, Migtsema (dMigs-brtse-ma), in praise of Jetsun Redawa, but this master re-dedicated it to Je Tsongkhapa thinking that the verse was more applicable and descriptive of Je Tsongkhapa’s qualities.It later became the verse recited for the Guru Yoga of Je Tsongkhapa or to invoke the blessings of Je Tsongkhapa.

At the age of thirty-three, Je Tsongkhapa encountered the remarkable Lama Umapa Pawo Dorje, with whom he studied Candrakīrti’s Madhyamakāvatāra (Entry to the Middle Way).Being able to have pure visions of Mañjuśrī, Lama Umapa became the intermediaryof Je Tshonkhapa in communicating with this Bodhisattva who would provide advices and responses to Je Tsongkhapa’s numerous questions concerning the correct understanding of the reality. Eventually,Je Tsongkhapa himself began to experience pure visions and was able to communicate with Mañjuśrī to receivedirect instructions and tantric initiations. Over the course of his life, Je Tsongkhapa continued to experience pure visions of Mañjuśrī as well as a host of other deities and masters such as Asaṅga and Nāgārjuna. It is believed that many of Je Tshongkhapa’s works were composed through the instructions and inspiration of deities and masters appearing in thepure visions, particularly Mañjuśrī, as described in his secret biography.

 

MEDITATION AND RETREAT:  Tsongkhapa combined studies with practice from a very early age. After completing his Golden Garland of Eloquence in 1388-1389, Je Tsongkhapa spend a period of some ten years engaging in meditation and retreats, including undertaking tantric retreats, doing an extensive retreat on Mañjuśrī with Lama Umapa, and, as advised by Mañjuśrī, going into a long, extensive retreat with his eight disciples at Chadrel Hermitage and Wölkha Cholung from 1392 to1398. Je Tsongkhapa is reputed to have performed millions of prostrations, mandala offerings and other forms of purification practice during the long retreat. Meanwhile, he simultaneously continued to study the most important texts dealing with the nature of reality.

WRITINGS AND TEACHINGS : Je Tsongkhapa began to teach in his 20s. He also started composing essays and treatises in these early years, including his most major early work, the Golden Garlandof Eloquence (Legs bshad gser phreng), a commentary on Maitreya’s Ornament for Clear Realization, completed at the age of 32.

During the last year of his retreat in Wölkha Cholung in 1398, Je Tsongkhapa is believed to have attained the highest realization and a perfect understanding of the ultimate reality. Upon this experience, he composedIn Praise of Dependent Origination to praise and pay homage to Buddha Sakyamuni for his profound teachings of dependent origination and emptiness. Following this spiritual experience, Je Tsongkhapa made a dramatic change in his life, turning more towards writing and teaching what he had realized. Most of his works were composed after that.

In 1402, at the age of forty-six, he composed the Lamrim Chenmo (The Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment), undoubtedly his most famous masterpiece. Based on Jowo Atisha Dīpaṃkara’s Bodhipathapradīpa (Lamp to the Path of Enlightenment), it describes in detail the gradual path to enlightenment from the perspective of the Sutrayāna. Following the composition of the Lamrim Chenmo, he wrote several other works around 1407 and 1408, specifically TheOcean of Reasoning (rigs pa’i rgya mtsho), a commentary on Nāgārjuna’s Fundamental Treatise on the Middle Way (Mūlamadhyamakakārikā),and The Essence of Eloquence (legs bshad snying po). In 1415 he composed the Lamrim Dring (The MediumTreatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment), a condensed version of the Lamrim Chenmo, and in 1418, one year before his death, the Elucidation of the Intention (dGongs pa Rab gSal)on Candrakīrti’s Entry to the Middle Way. Influential works on monastic codes andethical codes for bodhisattvas as well as tantric practitioners were also written in the course of time.

Je Tsongkhapa was also a prolific author of tantric literature. As a companion volume to the Lamrim Chenmo, he wrote in 1405 the Ngagrim Chenmo (The Great Exposition of Tantra), covering all the four classes of tantra according to the sarma (new) traditions, with a detailed explanation of the two stages of Anuttarayoga (Highest Yoga) tantra. Other important tantric works include his works on Guhyasamāja, especially his Commentary on the Vajrajñānasamuccayanāma Tantra(ye shes rdo rje kun las btus pa zhes bya ba’i rgyud) in 1401and Lamp Illuminating the Five Stages of Guhyasamāja (gsang ‘dus rim lnga gsal sgron) in 1411. Texts on the Guhyasamāja Tantra feature prominently in Je Tsongkhapa’s collected works, making up the majority of his eighteen volumes of writings. During his last years, Je Tsongkhapa devoted much of his time to giving extensive teachings.

THE FOUR GREAT DEEDS : Among Je Tsongkhapa’s numerous beneficial activities,four are mentioned in particular. The first deed was the renovation of the Maitreya statue and the subsequent great festival he organized during the Tibetan New Year in 1400 at Dzingji (‘Dzingji) temple, which housed the statue. The second deed was an extensive teaching on the vinaya (code of monastic discipline)for the ordained that he, Jetsun Redawa and Kyabchok Pal Zangpo gave for several months at Namtse Deng (gNam rtse Ideng) in 1402, which is said to have revitalized the tradition of monasticism in Tibet. The third deed was his establishment of the annual Great Prayer Festival (Monlam Chenmo) for universal well-being during the Tibetan new year in Lhasa in 1409, a tradition that is still performing to this day. And the fourth deed was the founding of Gaden Monastery (dGa’ Idan) in 1410 near Lhasa, which became his main seat, and the construction of the maṇḍalas of his main three Anuttarayoga tantra deities:Guhyasamāja, YamāntakaandCakrasaṃvara.

He is perhaps best known for other amazing deeds, however. He founded the Gelugpa tradition of Tibetan Buddhism, built on the foundations of the Kadampa tradition, the legacy of Atisha. Based on Tsongkhapa’s teachings, the two distinguishing characteristics of the Gelug tradition are the union of sutra and tantra and the emphasis on vinaya. Having studied at Sakya, Kadam and Drikung Kargyu monasteries, he was one of the foremost authorities on Tibetan Buddhism.

PASSING AWAY : Je Tsongkhapa passed away in 1419 at Gaden Monastery and was succeeded by one of his chief disciples, Gyaltsab Darma Rinchen, as the throne-holder of Gaden. His teachings were upheld and kept by Gyaltsab Darma Rinchen and another main disciple Khedrub Gelek Palsang. Personally and through his disciples, Je Tsongkhapa made an extremely significant impact on the development of Buddhism in Tibet and his influence extended to Mongolia and China. His eighteen volumes of collected works contain hundreds of titles relating to all aspects of Buddhist teachings and explicitly clarify some of the most difficult topics and points in both sutra and tantra. Thanks to Je Tsongkhapa’s un-biased, thorough and lucid style, his heritage ofmasterpieces and great teachings remain illuminating, inspiring and unparalleled today.

Sources:

Berzin Archives-A Short Biography of Tsongkhapa, Alexander Berzin, August 2003.

 

 

 

AUTHENTIC TIBETAN CUISINE EVENING.

 

AUTHENTIC   TIBETAN   CUISINE   EVENING. 
AND/OR
AUTHENTIC   TIBETAN    COOKING   CLASS  AND  DINNER – Come learn and/or witness monks make Momo’s/Naan and or Thenthuk – or not) 

 


You can invite between 10 to 30 people, or more if there is plenty of time.  This event can be done in the evening, after a day of mandala making, or not.  If in the evening, two monks and driver will leave the mandala making event and go food shopping that afternoon.  They will need to know if you want vegetable Momo’s or meat Momo’s or a combination of both and for how many people.  Plan the menu beforehand and communicate it to them.  They can also make Naan – a flat bread. You can ask guests to bring other dishes like rice, veggies, desserts.  Or not – this can be any way you see it. 

Example:  Cooking lessons starting at 5:30pm, dinner around 6:30pm – closing prayer ceremony, or house blessing by 7:30 or 8 – over by 9pm.  The monks will leave the mandala event probably around 3pm, do the shopping and go to the place (can be someone’s home, or a catering hall, church kitchen/dining area, etc) where the cooking and eating will take place.  They will start cutting up everything and get start until the registered cooking lesson guests arrive around 5:30.  Then they will teach them how to roll the dough and stuff and shape the momo.  LOTS of fun! 

Other people who do not want the class, but just want to come and eat, should arrive no later than 6:15pm,  Just before eating, say 6:30pm the monks will chant food blessings. 

Eat, relax, have fun.  Casually mix with the monks.  Don’t let them all sit together if possible.  You can tell them that the Americans would like to be with them, even if there are language difficulties.  Sharing food is universal and requires little conversation.

After dinner – 7:15 – 7:30 ish… you can have the monks do a Tea Puja or chant Om Mani Padme Hum for 15 minutes to 25 minutes.  You can give a brief introductory talk about why the tour is here, what happens to their donations, and introduce the Tour Leader who may also want to say a few words before praying.  Then the night would end.

For something like this people should be asked for a suggested donation of $25.00 to $35.00 (with the class) per person – IF you feel your community can afford this.  There is a big difference between very affluent communities and poor ones, so you decide.  The host should pay for all the groceries – especially if their house will be blessed during the prayers after dinner. 

 

 

 

 

Process of construction of Sand Mandala

Directions for Constructing a Mandala Board
Get 4 sheets of 3/4" plywood which measure 4'x8'. Have four 2 1/2' x 5' sections cut from the 4'x8' sheets.
Lay the sections on level ground with 2 sections on the bottom to form a 5'x5' square and two sections laid with the seam running perpendicular to form a 5'x5' square on the top.
Stacked that way you get a very solid, very heavy 5'x5' square that is 1 and 1/2 inches thick.

Read more...

MANDALA GROUP MEMBERS BIO

 
Venrable Tulku Lobsang Yarphel Rinpoche (On the Chair)

Born in 1981, he was recognized  by the great master Drepung Rinpoche as the reincarnation of Nyung Ney Lama.  At the age of 8, Lobsang Yarphel Rinpoche started his basic Buddhist studies under great master of his own monastery. In 1996, he went to Central Tibet, Lhasa for further religious studies where he joined Drepung Gomang Monastery, studying pramana, logics and other sacred teachings under the great master Gen. Tenzin la. After three years of his study there, he came to India to get blessing from His Holiness the Dalai Lama and joined Drepung Gomang Monastery in South India in 1999 as per the tradition. Starting his extensive religious studies in Pramana Vartikka-Logic for 4 years, Parchen-5 years course (Sanskrit:Prajraparamita, Eng:Perfection of Wisdom), Uma-2 years course (Sanskrit:Madhyamika, Eng:Middle View), Zoe -2 years course (Sanskrit:Abhidharma, Eng:Treasure of Knowledge), Dulva-2 years course(Sanskrit:Vinaya, Eng:Monastic Discipline) Currently on the final year of monastic curriculum.

Rinpoche received his Gestul vows (novice ordination) from Master Rabten Gyatso in 1989 and  Gelong vows (Full ordination vows) from none other than His Holiness the Dalai Lama in 2005. He has received many sacred teachings and initiations from His Holiness the Dalai Lama, late Gungru Khensur Rinpoche Tempa Tenzin, current abbot Khen Rinpoche Yonten Dhamchoe, Drepung Tripa Khensur Lobsang Tenpa and great master and scholar Geshe yonten.
 

GESHE TSOKNYE (third from right) ( Geshe Tsoknye couldn't visit Russia this year due to visa issues.



GESHE NAMDREL GYATSO (third from left)

Ven. Geshe Namdrel Gyatso, born in 1975, he became monk at the age of 13 at his native place. He received his novice ordination (Getsul) vows from Ven. Lobsang Tenzin in 1988. Studying first the elementary texts, he joined this monastery in 1994. He received his full ordination vows (Gelong vows) from His Holiness the Dalai Lama in 2000. After completion of monastic curriculum, he was honored with Geshe title in 2011. Geshe Namdrel Gyatso is  qualified in Sand Mandala construction, creation of Butter Sculpture and prayers/chants.
 
VEN. DR LOBSANG TSETRUIM (left inset)

Tibetan Doctor Ven. Lobsang Tseltruim is a bona fide monk of our monastery, reputed and qualified Tibetan doctor, registered with Central Tibetan Council of Medicine. He has served here at monastery dispensary for many years before extending his service to Tashi Kyil Monastery where he practice these days. He has officially visited Russia in 2012 and 2013 with Mandala tour groups where he has successfully extends his service and assistance to the area they visited with great benefits to the public in general.

Besides usual consultation and prescription of Tibetan medicines, Dr. Lobsang Tseltruim will be offer following service:-

Golden needle acupuncture therapy
Tibetan moxabustion
Urine examination
Mantra healing (to remove obstacles, evil spirit
Astrology


JAMPA TENZIN (second on left)

Jampa Tenzin, born in 1983 at Mundgod. He joined Drepung Gomang Monastery in 1989 as he always wants to become a monk, he received novice ordination vows (Getsul vows) from Drepung Tripa Khensur Lobsang Tenpa, the current throne holder of Drepung Monastery in 1999 and Gelong Vows (Bhikhu ordination vows: full ordination) in 2006 from His Holiness the Dalai Lama. Currently, he is studying in Zoe class (Abhidharmakosh) of the monastic curriculum. As the member of monastery’s religious tour group, he is trained master of chants (overtone), has expertise in Sand Mandala painting and butter sculpture. He has visited Russia (2009) and Poland (2010), United States of America in 2012.

 LOBSANG TSETEN (first on left)

Born in 1981, Lobsang Tseten became monk at the age of 18 and joined this monastery in 1998. He received his Getsul vows (novice ordination vows) in from Drepung Tripa Khensur Rinpoche Lobsang Tenpa and Gelong vows (Bhikhu ordination vows: Full ordination)  from His Holiness the Dalai Lama in 2009. Currently he is in Karam class of the monastic curriculum. He is qualified in Sand Mandala construction, butter sculpture and chants/prayer rituals. He will also play the monastic religious musical instruments like little trumpet (Gyaling) and Long horn (dungchen)

JAMYANG PALDEN (second from Right)

Born in Amdo Tibet in 1983, he became monk at the age of 13 at his native place. He joined Drepung Gomang Monastery in 2000. He received his novice ordination vows (Getsul vows) from his teacher Ven. Jamyang Gyatso in 1996 and full ordination vows (Gelong vows) from His Holiness the Dalai Lama in 2013. Currently, Ven. Jamyang Palden is studying in Pharchen class of the monastic curriculum. He possessed a good skill in Sand Mandala construction, creation of Butter Sculpture and prayers/chants, also will be able to monastic religious musical instruments like little trumpet (Gyaling) and Long horn (dungchen)

ALDYN KHEREL NORBU (first from right)
 
Ven. Aldyn Kherel  Norbu (Sherab), Tuva monk student of monastery will be accompanying the group as the interpreter. He has assisted with translation in past tours as well as here in themonastery. (first from Right)

 

 

 

SAT WESTERN 2014 MEMBERS SHORT BIOS


Drepung Gomang  'Sacred Arts Tour 2014 Tour  is formally invited by the Tashi Gomang Dharma Center of Drepung Gomang Institute, located in Louisville, Kentucky. The center is a 501 (c) 3 is committed to preserving the Tibetan Culture, Traditions and Religion. Sue Simone is the National coordinator and can be reached at 203 725 6888.


SAT Western tour members 2014

BRIEF BIOS SAT WESTERN TOUR MEMBERS 2014
 

NAME:                TSEWANG THINLEY (tour leader on the chair)

Geshe Lharampa Tsewang Thinley, born in Kargil (Indian State of Jammu and Kashmir). From young age, he has great wishes to become a monk. At the age of 11, he became monk and joined Drepung Gomang Monastery in 1986 where he started studies on the elementary monastic texts. He completed all the monastic class (Five Major Treatise on Buddhist Philosophy, 16 year courses) and has also passed all the Gelug Gyuktoe (Gelug University Examination of six years course) with remarkable result and was conferred Geshe Lharampa title in 2008 (equivalent to Ph.D in Western University). He also joined one-year mandatory Tantric course at Gyutoe Tantric College in 2009. As the member of Sacred Arts Tour group 2014, he is qualified in conducting all the religious ceremonies and prayer chants, Buddhist rituals. He is also qualified to provide religious teachings, talks and will participate in any interfaith discussion. He will participate in Cultural Pageant as Chöd Master. He is senior most member of the tour group and will lead the monastery’s tour 2014.
 
NAME:                NGAWANG LHUDUP (first from left)

Ngawang Lhudup, born in 1984 at Mundgod,  at age 11, he became a monk at his native place and studied reading texts before joining Drepung Gomang Monastery in 2000 where he continued his further monastic studies on Buddhist Philosophy, At present, he is studying at Zoe Class (Abhidharmakosh) of monastic curriculum. As the member of Sacred Arts tour group 2014, he is the Chant Master and well qualified in all the religious chanting during religious ceremonies, master in construction of Sand Mandala painting, he will be performing in Yak Lion Dance and Chöd, playing drum and Dungchen (Long horn) during the cultural Pageant. He has visited Russia in 2011 and Mongolia in 2013.
 
NAME:                DORJEE PHUNTSOK    (second from right)

Dorjee Phuntsok, age 39, born in Mundgod, he became monk in year 1986 at his native place, initially studying how to read Buddhist text. He joined Drepung Gomang Monastery in 1991 to pursue monastic studies of Buddhist Philosophy, studying first the elementary texts of the monastic curriculum. He has been active in his religious practice and studies and at present he is studying in Dulva (Vinaya) of Monastic curriculum. As the member of Sacred Arts Tour group 2014, he is qualified in all the chants, construction of Sand Mandala painting and butter sculpture. He also will be performing in Snow Lion Dance, Yak Dance, playing Dungchen (religious musical long horn) and Chöd ritual during the cultural pageant.

 
NAME:                SONAM GYATSO    (second from left)

Sonam Gyatso born in Mundgod on 1977, at the age of 11 he became a monk initially studying and reading the texts under his teacher at his native place, in 2001 he joined Drepung Gomang Monastery where he continued his further monastic studies on Buddhist Philosophy. At present, he is studying at Zoe Class (Abhidharmakosh) of monastic curriculum. As the member of this sacred art group 2014, he is qualified in the construction of Sand Mandala, butter sculpture and conducting religious ceremonies. During the cultural pageant, he will be participating in Snow Lion dance, yak dance and Chöd ritual, he will be also playing Gyaling (Little musical pipes: Little Trumpet) and drum.
 
NAME:                JAMYANG JINPA (center)

Jamyang Jinpa, born at Mundgod on 11/11/1985, he always has a great wish to become a monk from his childhood and his parents enrolled him as a monk in 1993 where he was introduced to basic religious studies of reading texts and scripture. In 1998, he joined Drepung Gomang Monastery and continued his further studies. Studying first, the elementary texts under his texts. At present, he has reached Zoe Class (Abhidharmakosh) of Monastic curriculum which is of 16 years.  As the member of this sacred Art group 2014, he is qualified in Sand Painting, Butter sculpture and prayer ceremonies. He also will be participating in Tashi Sholpa dance (Good luck dance), playing Gyaling (Little musical pipes: Little Trumpet) and drum during the cultural pageant.

 
NAME:                SONAM STANZIN (first from right)

Sonam Stanzin, age 28 was born in Leh (Ladakh region), at the age of 16 he became a monk initially studying and reading the texts under his teachers, in 2001 he joined Drepung Gomang Monastery where he continued his further monastic studies on Buddhist Philosophy, At present, he is studying at Zoe Class (Abhidharmakosh) of monastic curriculum. As the member of this sacred art group 2014, he is qualified in the construction of Sand Mandala, butter sculpture and conducting religious ceremonies. During the cultural pageant, he will be participating in Tashi Sholpa dance (Good luck dance), yak dance and Chöd ritual, he will be also playing Dungchen (Long Horn: religious musical instrument) and drum.

SAT EASTERN 2014 MEMBERS SHORT BIO

Drepung Gomang  'Sacred Arts Tour 2014 Tour  is formally invited by the Tashi Gomang Dharma Center of Drepung Gomang Institute, located in Louisville, Kentucky. The center is a 501 (c) 3 is committed to preserving the Tibetan Culture, Traditions and Religion. Sue Simone is the National coordinator and can be reached at 203 725 6888.

 


The authentic Tibetan programs that the group offers are a blend of ancient cultural, religious, and artistic expressions.  You may choose to offer an educational program focusing on ancient historic beliefs, an artful performance or display that demonstrates colorful Tibetan traditions, and/or a truly inspirational combination of Tibetan art, history and sacred traditions that completely inspire the spirit.

2014-2015 tour is led by Geshe Lharampa Yonten Gyatso. (on the chair)

BRIEF BIOS OF SAT EASTERN MEMBERS 2014-2015
 

NAME:                YONTEN GYATSO (on chair)

Geshe Lharampa Yonten Gyatso born in Darjiling. From young age, he has great wishes to become a monk. At the age of 15, he became monk and studied reading of Buddhist texts at his native place. In 1985, he joined Drepung Gomang Monastery where he started studies on the elementary monastic texts. He completed all the monastic class (Five Major Treatise on Buddhist Philosophy, 16 year courses) and has also passed all the Gelug Gyuktoe (Gelug University Examination of six years course) with remarkable result and was conferred Geshe Lharampa title in 2003 (equivalent to Ph.D in Western University). He also joined one-year mandatory Tantric course at Gyumed Tantric College in 2004. As the member of Sacred Arts Tour group of 2014, he is profoundly qualified in giving religious teachings, conducting traditional Buddhist Ceremonies, chants and Buddhist rituals. He is also qualified to give religious teachings, talks and will participate in any interfaith discussion and will participate in Cultural Pageant as Chöd Master. He is senior most member of the tour group and will lead the monastery’s tour 2014. He has visited Russia in 1997. He also served as the Discipline Head of this monastery in 2012-2013

NAME:                KHERAP GYATSO (second from left)
I
Kherap Gyatso, age 39, was born at Mundgod, he became a monk at the age pf 11 in 1986 and undertook studies on reading scriptures at his native place. In 1993 he joined Drepung Gomang Monastery to continue his studies on Buddhist Philosophy. He completed all the monastic class (Five Major Treatise on Buddhist Philosophy, 16 year courses) of the monastic curriculum and was honored with Geshe Kabchu title in 2009. As the member of this sacred art Tour group 2014, he is qualified in conducting religious ceremonies, chants and rituals and also qualified in construction of Buddhist religious Sand Mandala, conducting workshop on Sand Mandala and Buddhist religious butter sculpture. During the cultural pageant, he will participate as Chöd Master during chanting.
 
 NAME:                TSEPAK LOBSANG (second from right)

Born in 1981 at Mundgod, Tsepak Lobsang became monk in 1989 at his native place and joined Drepung Gomang Monastery in 1991 to pursue further monastic studies. Since then he has been active in his religious practice and studies and completed monastic curriculum which he was honored with Geshe Kabchu title in 2011. As the member of Sacred Arts tour group 2014, he is the Chant Master and well qualified in all the religious chanting during religious ceremonies, master in construction of Sand Mandala painting, he  will be performing in Snow Lion Dance and Chöd, playing drum and little trumpet (gyaling) during the cultural Pageant. He is highly expert and qualified in painting, butter sculpting. He also visited Slovenia in 2001, Italy 2003 and Russia 2012 as religious group.
 
NAME:                JAMPHEL GYATSO (fourth from right)

Jamphel Gyatso, born in 1982 at Mundgod,  at the age 10, he became a monk at his native place and studied reading texts before joining Drepung Gomang Monastery in 1997 where continued his further monastic studies on Buddhist Philosophy, At present, he is studying at Dulva Class (Vinaya) of monastic curriculum. As the member of this sacred art group 2014, he is qualified in the construction of Sand Mandala, Butter sculpture, religious ceremonies and chants.  During the cultural pageant, he will be taking part in Tashi Sholpa dance (Good luck dance), Snow Lion Dance and Chöd ritual and also playing Dungchen (the religious instrument: Long Horn)
 
NAME:                SOPA GYATSO (First Left)

Sopa Gyatso, born on 1986 at Mundgod, at the age of 13 he became a monk at his native place. He joined Drepung Gomang Monastery in 2003 where he continued his monastic studies of Buddhist Philosophy of sixteen year curriculum. Currently, he is studying in Karam Buk of monastic curriculum. As the member of this sacred art Tour group 2014, he is qualified to conduct religious ceremonies and Buddhist chants, qualified in the construction of Sand Mandala painting, butter sculpture. During the cultural pageant, he will be also playing Gyaling (small trumpet;religious musical instrument) and taking part in Snow Lion Dance and Chöd ritual.
 
NAME:                JINPA GYATSO (third from left)

Jinpa Gyatso, age 35, born in Mundgod, he became monk in year 1988 at his native place, his family really considered this to be an auspicious when someone from family join a monastery. He joined Drepung Gomang Monastery in 1999 to pursue monastic studies of Buddhist Philosophy, studying first the elementary texts of the monastic curriculum. He has been active in his religious practice and studies and at present he is studying in Karam Buk. As the member of Sacred Arts Tour group 2014, he is qualified in all the chants, construction of Sand Mandala painting and butter sculpture. He also will be performing in Snow Lion Dance, playing Gyaling (religious musical pipes) and Chöd ritual during the cultural pageant. He has visited Russia in 2011 as a religious group.

 
NAME:                TSULTRIM DORJEE (third from right)

Tsultrim Dorjee, born in 1987 at remote village of Tawang (Arunachal Pradesh),  at the young  age of 9, he became a monk and joined Drepung Gomang Monastery in 1996 where initially studied the elementary texts under his teacher and then continued his further monastic studies on Buddhist Philosophy, At present, he is studying at Zoe Class (Abhidharmakosh) of monastic curriculum. As the member of this sacred art group 2014, he is qualified in the construction of Sand Mandala, Butter sculpture, religious ceremonies.  During the cultural pageant, he will be participating in Tashi Sholpa dance (Good luck dance), yak dance and Chöd ritual, he will be also playing Dungchen (Long Horn; religious musical instrument). 


NAME:                TENPA TSERING (First right)

Tenpa Tsering, born in 1983 at Mundgod,  at age 12, he became a monk at his native place and studied reading texts before joining Drepung Gomang Monastery in 2003 where continued his further monastic studies on Buddhist Philosophy, At present, he is studying at Parchen Class (Prajnaparamita) of monastic curriculum. As the member of this sacred art group 2014, he is qualified in the construction of Sand Mandala, Butter sculpture, religious ceremonies.  During the cultural pageant, he will be taking part in Tashi Sholpa dance (Good luck dance) and Chöd ritual.

 

 

SAND MANDALA PRESERVATION

Sand Mandala Preservation

(Kindly note that as per the tradition followed, the Sand Mandala are dismantled after the completion to symbolize impermanence of the life and world, but in past request have been received to preserve the Sand Mandala. The tour group has the full discretion power to whether to dismantle or preserve the Sand Mandala upon request made by some museums and libraries, it is request to everyone to kindly preserve it well with proper respect to the object of veneration)


Report by Laura Jennnings, Claire Hoevel and Laura Reutter upon the preservation of the Amitayus sand mandala made by Drepung Gomang monks at the Tibetan Cultural Center in December of 1993

The sand mandala was executed the week of December 26, 1993. An initial spraying of the mandala was made before it was complete, to prevent the sand from shifting due to
vibrations in the floor. At this time the central area contained within the raised square ridge of sand was consolidated with two coats of Krylon Crystal Clear (#1301). The first
coating was made from a height of about 24+ inches. A second coating was applied somewhat more closely. After the mandala was finished, spray coatings of Krylon
Crystal Clear (#1301) and Krylon Matte (#1311) were made over the entire surface. Aapproximately 6 to 8 cans of varnish were used to consolidate a 5” by 5” mandala,
applied in repeated coats with a 10 to 15 minute interval between coats. (A senior chemist at Krylon was confident that both fixatives were extremely stable
acrylic resin formulations and stated that many successful aging tests had been performed without any yellowing.)


One problem was encountered using the Krylon Matte (#1311) spray which made it undesirable. As it was applied, the matting agent in the varnish (fumed silica) formed a
whitish haze over the areas of the mandala not being sprayed, dulling the colors. The may have been due to the spray drying before it hit the surface of the mandala. This
problem was corrected by discontinuing the use of the matte spray and going over the dull areas with the gloss varnish at a fairly close distance. The whitish haze disappeared,
restoring the vivid colors to the sand.

 

chenresig mandala

 

 

 



Chenrezig (Sanskrit: Avalokiteshvara)



Chenrezig (Avalokiteshvara) is the Bodhisattva of Compassion.  A bodhisattva is an enlightened being who has decided to delay becoming a fully enlightened Buddha and who lives in a compassionate spirit life for the sake of all beings He has taken vows to save all beings. With a mantra, Om mani padme hum! (Hail the jewel in the lotus), he tirelessly attempts to deliver all beings from suffering. He appears in many different forms to assist suffering beings.

Tibetans believe that Chenrezig, as a disciple of the Buddha, made a vow of compassion to free the Tibetan peoples from their violent ways: "May I be able to establish in emancipation all living beings in the barbaric Land of Snow; where the beings are so hard to discipline and none of the buddhas of the three times has stepped...May I be able to mature and emancipate them, each according to his/her own way. May that gloomy barbaric country become bright, like an island of precious jewels." (Geshe Wangyal , Door of Liberation, New York, Lotsawa, 1978, pp. 54-55). He is the patron of Tibet. The Tibetan people claim descent from Chenrezig, who in the form of a monkey sired the original inhabitants of Tibet. Chenrezig, according to Tibetan legends, has appeared in numerous forms to defend Buddhist teachings. He has been identified with the Tibetan emperor Songtsen Gampo (617-698 C.E.) and the successive lineage of Dalai Lamas. The 14th Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso, is the current incarnation of Chenrezig.

Tibetans believe that every person whose heart is moved by love and compassion, who deeply and sincerely act for the benefit of others without concern for fame, profit, social position, or recognition expresses the activity of Chenrezig. Love and compassion are the true signs revealing the presence of Chenrezig.

Compassion is the most important religious practice. For Tibetan Buddhists, compassion is sensitivity to the sufferings of others and attempt to relieve suffering. It is the realization that we (human beings, animals, and the earth itself) are all interconnected. The Buddha is an example of compassion, for he taught human beings the way to freedom.

BRIEF DISCRIPTION OF THE MANDALA OF AVALOKITESHVARA


Avalokiteshvara, or Chenrezig as he is known in Tibetan, is the Buddhist deity who personifies the ideal of compassion. He can be portrayed in several different forms, two of the most popular being as a white deity with either four arms or 1000 arms; the extra arms symbolize his ability to help many beings simultaneously.

The Mandala can be described as being the residence of the respective deities and their retinues. The sand Mandala of Avalokiteshvara was originated from the tantric teachings of Lord Buddha Shakyamuni. Although depicted on a flat surface, the Mandala is actually three-dimensional, being a “divine mansion” at the center of which resides Avalokiteshvara, surrounded by the deities of his entourage.

Every aspect of the Mandala has meaning: nothing is arbitrary or superfluous. The four outer walls of the mansion are in five transparent layers, colored as white, yellow, red, green, and blue, representing faith, effort, memory, meditation, and wisdom (these five colors also represent the five dankinis). The four doorways, one in the center of each of the four walls, represent the Four Immeasurable Thoughts: love, compassion, joy, and equanimity and there are decorated with precious jewels. The lotus flower in the center of the Mandala represent the lotus family, one of the Buddha families that correspond to the five psychophysical components of a human being, and which purify specific impure states of mind; the Lotus family purifies passion into discriminating awareness. The white thousand arms, thousand-eyed Avalokiteshvara is standing in the center of the lotus flower, on a white moon disk. In the four directions are seated his retinue seated on white full moon disks. The deities arise from the unity of; the wisdom of emptiness and great bless of the principle deity Avalokiteshvara. Seated on the eastern red petal is the purified aspect of Hatred in the form of a blue deity Akshobhya, on the southern yellow petal is the purified aspect of Misery in the form of a yellow deity Rathasambhava and likewise, the purified part of Ignorance & Jealousy are represented by the white deity Vaivochana at the western and the green deity Amogasiddhi at the northern petal respectively. The central deity Avaloketishvara represents the freedom from attachment. The four colors in the four directions are the emanated light rays of the four deity retinues. The lotus itself symbolizes the mind of renunciation. To protect the residence from negative conditions, it is surrounded by a Vajra fence, which also symbolizes the continuous teaching of the Vajrayana (Tantric Teaching) by lord Avalokiteshvara. In the outmost part, it is circled with burning flames radiate with intense light are not only for protection but also to burn away or to get red of delusion and the dark nesses of the ignorance.

In general, the Mandala shows a method of bringing peace and harmony in our world, through genuine practices of the mind of Great Compassion, the Wisdom of Emptiness, and the meditations of Mandala with their respective deities. We can generate the respective qualities as mentioned and thereby bring about a positive change in this world of ours. For a practitioner who meditate on the Tantra of Avalokiteshvara, one would familiarize oneself with every detail of the Mandala and the deities within it, engaging in repeated exercises based upon visualizing the pure beings and pure environment which symbolized one’s own being and environment in purified, sublime form. Such exercises, carried out within the basic Buddhist framework of developing wisdom and compassion, bring about a profound transformation of the psyche. Just to glimpse the Mandala, however, will create a positive impression on the mind-stream of the observer, who for a moment is in touch with the profound potential for perfect Enlightenment, which exists within the mind of all beings.

At the end of ritual ceremony, the Mandala will be systematically dismantled and the sand powder of the Mandala will be thrown into a clean river or a sea to remind the impermanence of the world. In fact, it serves to enrich the soil and the mineral resources and to eliminate the untimely death, diseases, famine etc.

In conclusion, we dedicate the merits generate in the preparation of this Mandala together with its rituals for the world peace and true happiness of all the sentient beings. May peace prevail on the Earth!!

Files: For Printout and for Making Transparencies


Chenrezig Mandala Descriptive Overlay
Chenrezig Mandala with Descriptive Overlay

 

 

 

amitayus mandala

Amitayus

 

Amitayus  Mandala

 



Buddha Amitayus is the main bodhisattva form-emanation of the fire-element, which is symbolized by the Buddha Amithaba and the according deities, called the lotus-family. In most Mandalas the fire-element has the color red, is associated with the western region of the universe and has the lotos or nectar-vase as it's symbol. The lotos stands for pure intentions of all activities, while the nectar vase, filled with the subtle life-energy (nectar) demonstrates the immense power of this element.

Because of the life extending energy and the possibility to gain rebirth on a lotos flower in one of his beautiful western paradises, He is the most popular Buddha not just in Tibet but also in China and Japan. There are hundreds of traditions, cults and sects centered around Amithaba/Amitayus. Some traditions (basically in Japan) associate Amithaba with the sun and make special ceremonies at sunrise and sundawn. Among His many peaceful and wrathful deity aspects some highly popular ones are Chenrezig (Avalokiteshvara) with the famous mantra OM MANI PADME HUNG, White Tara with the mantra OM TARE TUTARE TURE SVAHA and the Red Dakini. Both The Dalai Lama and The Panchen Lama are seen as emanations of Amithaba. The Dalai Lama as a form-emanation of Chenrezig and The Panchen Lama as a form-emanation of Amithaba/Amitayus.

Files: For Printout and for Making Transparencies


Amitayus Mandala Descriptive Overlay
Amitayus Mandala with Descriptive Overlay

 

Long Term Payday Loans – Are these Better than Short-Term Loans?

The demand for payday loans is still on rise and thousands of applications reach the lending companies for sanctioning of the loans every week. People are looking for the short-term loans as an alternative to the credit cards and conventional bank loans. However, there are still millions of individuals looking for long-term credit methods.
Travelling in USA